gps suggestions

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gps suggestions

Postby robtaylor » Tue Jan 15, 2008 7:31 am

i'm thinking about getting a gps for this ride, and for general use in the car.
i'm looking at the garmin nuvi, and the tomtom one. right now i'm leaning towards tomtom

i like garmin's reputation, but i like the fact that you can look up routes for slow speed, bicycle, avoid freeways, walking, etc on the tomtom

the tie breaker may be one thing

i think oopsclunkthud has file that could be uploaded into a gps, is that correct? and would that work on the garmin nuvi or tomtom one?

or in other words does anyone know if you can upload your own map file into these units

if anyone knows please enlighten me.

thanks
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Postby MarkH » Tue Jan 15, 2008 2:56 pm

make sure it's waterproof to some point, and make sure it can handle the vibrations.

my garmin was billed as a motorcycle gps but it couldn't always handle the Lambretta. would lock up occassionaly and the built in antenae rattled it's connection loose. had to go with a remote one.
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Postby OopsClunkThud » Tue Jan 15, 2008 7:07 pm

I'm creating the route on a garmin but the converters are getting better and I only use that as a step to creating the google earth routes.

Careful with the nuvi, last time round someone got one and it had a limit of I think 2 via points per route. you will need about 20 to pull some of the routes on track.

I used a garmin etrex last time and have been very happy with it. Really good battery life, what you plan on the computer matches what you get on the screen... but it just died this last weekend. not sure if I'll get it fixed, get another one, or get the Zumo.

On a vintage bike you will want good battery life and that would rule out the Zumo. Also consider the cost of the maps, you need the city navigator to go with the etrex.
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Postby Styrax » Wed Jan 16, 2008 7:24 am

I used a garmin 2720 with a motorcycle mount that I bought from Aerostich. It worked great but I never figured out a way to program the exact route into it. I hard wired it to my battery (with a fuse in the line) and had no problems.
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Postby OopsClunkThud » Wed Jan 16, 2008 12:55 pm

The process of putting the route into the GPS software is almost as helpful as having the GPS in the first place. By doing this you are basically forcing yourself to look at the detail map of each day and consider every turn. This stays in the back of the mind as general knowledge of the planned route and then the GPS is letting you know where you are on that route.

The google earth routes can be imported as a "track" to just about any GPS and followed visually even without the prompts on where to turn or even a detailed street map loaded.
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Postby osmedd » Sun Jan 20, 2008 2:47 pm

I used a TomTom for the 2006 Cannonball and it died posing in front of the Teton Pass. I haven't seem the redesigned mount, but the original was designed to fail, forcing me to carry rubber bands to try and hold the GPS to the mount.

I purchased a Zumo when they came out and have been very very happy with it, having exercised it on quite a few long distance rides. Highly recommended. I don't the "avoid roadblock" feature as obvious as the TomTom but it does work and in every other feature the Zumo wins hands down.

In addition, the car mount included with the Zumo has a built in speaker and microphone, so it will act as a hands free unit for your bluetooth phone.
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Postby rocket » Fri Feb 08, 2008 2:02 am

all of the gs's have good and bad points, but being very very familiar with its modus operandi, its vital because you can then optimise the good and work around the bad. i didnt have a clue how to work mine and it cost me , if it wasnt fot mark h and jim t and patrick on the last day the cannonbal would not have been so much fun and way more frustration due to being lost and coming in in the dark and tired. what ever you buy, use it alot before the c/b in your car and on your scoot, oh and do it while wearin your helmet and gloves and moving on non freeway type roads. i really believe that if you wanna be competertive this is the deal breaker..R
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Postby SBWNik » Tue Mar 18, 2008 5:26 pm

how about cell phone based systems? Any use on a scooter?

I'm looking at getting a bluetooth kitted helmet before the ride to, so one with voice directions via that would help.

Any ideas? Battery life is my biggest concern as it looks now like I'll be riding a stock manual 200 Vespa and there is no power take off.
I'd rather not cut holes in someone elses scooter just to mount a power point :D
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Postby rocket » Thu Mar 20, 2008 12:49 am

hey nik if it has a battery i can put a fag socket on it without marking the scoot in any way, find out if it has a battery then il get all the gear together, [should be about $30] and cut it to lenght and solder it here then all il have to do is hook it up to your battery run the cable under the ceter mat and into the t/box and it will just sit in there, find out if it has a bat first.. R
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Postby jess » Thu Mar 20, 2008 7:01 am

SBWNik wrote:Battery life is my biggest concern as it looks now like I'll be riding a stock manual 200 Vespa and there is no power take off.
I'd rather not cut holes in someone elses scooter just to mount a power point :D

If battery life is a big factor (and if you don't end up doing the power adapter thing rocket is offering) then something from the Garmin eTrex line is probably your best bet. There's a whole bunch of them to choose from, depending on your needs. They're waterproof and hiking-specific, but the higher-end models in the Garmin eTrex line have routable street information. They run on double-As, and you should be able to get a whole day out of one. They're also small, rugged, and easy to pocket.

I used a Garmin eTrex Vista Cx for a while on my scooter, and really loved it. Just be sure to get one that can accommodate street-level routing, or you'll just be looking at a screen with a line on it.
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